Q & A: How do cat’s digest their food?

Q. HOW DO CATS DIGEST THEIR FOOD?

A.

1.Oesophagus – Cats have a long and wide food pipe to carry food from the mouth to the stomach

2.Stomach – The digestive process starts here. Cats are carnivores– cats are  carnivores and need at least 20% protein in their diet.  A cat’s stomach is small (volume ranges between 300 carry food from the mouth to and 350ml) and they therefore need to eat several small meals, rather than one big meal a day. A cat’s stomach acids are strong enough to dissolve bones.

3.Large intestine or colon – once the nutrients are absorbed, the rest (waste) enters the colon and is transported to the rectum for discharge.

4.Small intestine – here nutrients are absorbed from the partially digested food. The cat’s digestive tract is geared to meat eating. It is shorter than that of omnivores and lacks the enzymes necessary to digest carbohydrates and plant-derived nutrients.

5.Liver – this organ processes the nutrients into essential fatty and amino acids. A cat’s liver cannot produce these building blocks without animal protein. The liver also produces bile, which is used to break down the fat molecules in a cat’s diet.

Q. WHY DOES YOUR CAT’S ONE EYE WATER CONSTANTLY?

A. You do need to keep an eye on your cat’s eyes as they can get worse very quickly. The most important thing is whether the eye seems red and painful and if she is blinking it a lot. If any of these apply then there is something wrong that needs checking out by your veterinarian soon. If it is open wide and does not seem at all sore or inflamed, then she could have developed a bit of a ‘chill’ in it, something may have irritated it, or there are certain infections that can make cats’ eyes water. (Is there any sneezing?) She may also have a blocked tear duct, which means that the tears will overflow on that side. If she seems fine otherwise, it would be worthwhile to bathe her eyes gently with warm water and cotton wool to wipe away the tears and see if that helps. If it still persists after a few days of this, it would be better to get it checked out by your vet to be on the safe side.

x

Check Also

Share the love: Does your cat have what it takes to be a therapy cat?

Share the love: Does your cat have what it takes to be a therapy cat?